WESTERN PROJECT @ JAUS

JAUS: 11858 La Grange Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90025
Through April 24, 2016
Featuring work from: Daniel Brice, Tim Forcum, Beverly Fishman, Dion Johnson, Joe Lloyd, John Schlue, Christian Tedeschi, Wayne White

Western Project @ JAUS - Group Show - Opening March 19, 2016

Western Project welcomes 2016 @ JAUS with new work from:

DANIEL BRICE / BEVERLY FISHMAN / TIM FORCUM / DION JOHNSON / JOE LLOYD
JOHN SCHLUE / CHRISTIAN TEDESCHI / WAYNE WHITE

March 19 - April 24, 2016
OPENING RECEPTION FOR THE ARTISTS: Saturday, March 19 4:00 - 8:00 PM
REGULAR EXHIBITION HOURS: THURSDAY - SATURDAY 12:00 - 4:00 PM

11851 LA GRANGE AVE. LOS ANGELES, CA 90024

11851 LA GRANGE AVE. LOS ANGELES, CA 90024

JOE LLOYD, Slant, 2016, acrylic on canvas, 56 x 96 inches

JOE LLOYD, Slant, 2016, acrylic on canvas, 56 x 96 inches

BEVERLY FISHMAN, Untitled (depression), 2016, Urethane Paint on MDF, 38 x 2.5 inches

BEVERLY FISHMAN, Untitled (depression), 2016, Urethane Paint on MDF, 38 x 2.5 inches

OPENING RECEPTION FOR THE ARTISTS: SATURDAY, MARCH 19 4:00 - 8:00 PM

Regular exhibition hours: Thursday - Saturday 12:00 - 4:00 PM

11851 LA GRANGE AVE. LOS ANGELES, CA 90024

11851 LA GRANGE AVE. LOS ANGELES, CA 90024

JOHN SCHLUE, TYPHON, 2015, acrylic felt on canvas over panel, 102 x 102 inches

JOHN SCHLUE, TYPHON, 2015, acrylic felt on canvas over panel, 102 x 102 inches

DION JOHNSON, Sonic Sky, 2016, acrylic on canvas, 60 x 80 inches

DION JOHNSON, Sonic Sky, 2016, acrylic on canvas, 60 x 80 inches

WAYNE WHITE, Fuck That Shit, 2015, acrylic on offset lithograph, framed, 28 x 40 inches

WAYNE WHITE, Fuck That Shit, 2015, acrylic on offset lithograph, framed, 28 x 40 inches

11 YEARS - Anniversary Group Show: December 6 - 23, 2014

11th year Anniversary Exhibition

Ron Athey / Josh Bolin / Daniel Brice / Thomas Burke / Carole Caroompas / Cole Case / Alec Egan / Samantha Fields / Bob Flanagan and Sheree Rose / Tim Forcum / Eric Freeman / Sush Machida Gaikotsu / Margaret Griffith / Dion Johnson / Ali Kheradyar / Patrick Lee / Joe Lloyd / Zachari Logan / Bob Mizer / Matthew Penkala / Nancy Riegelman / Chad Robertson / Joe Schmelzer / Nicolas Shake / Aaron Sheppard / Arne Svenson / Christian Tedeschi / Tom of Finland / Mark Dean Veca / Wayne White / Jessica Wimbley


Western Project proudly presents our 11th Year Anniversary Exhibition marking a decade and a year of programming. As one of the pioneer galleries of the Culver City arts district, the show will include gallery artists and some special guests; each an irregular, unruly and often impolite force of nature, all burdened with the disease of individual thinking and a call to find a greater depth of human experience. We celebrate with abandon and humor, knowing our job is yet unfinished.

CHRISTIAN TEDESCHI -5244 Baltimore - New Sculpture and Collages

May 10 – June 7, 2014Opening reception for the artist Saturday May 10th 6 – 8pm

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Western Project is proud to present the first solo exhibition by Los Angeles sculptor, Christian Tedeschi. He is an MFA graduate of Cranbrook Academy of Art, 2001 and co-founder of the infamous Detroit art collective, Object Orange. Titled, 5244 Baltimore (the address of his residence) the artist has built a facsimile of his front porch along with other sculptures, establishing uncanny narratives and experiences. 5244 Baltimore is a doppelganger roofed structure as portrait, mirror, stage set; a kind of hermetic history tableau. His new veranda exists as evidence of the artist’s process and his direct relationship with materials. More, the work explores space as metaphor:

“I am interested in the shape of a horse’s saddle, a hyperbolic paraboloid. A complex form which exhibits an interior and exterior space simultaneously. When I think of this form I see an abstract representation of the human condition; to exist inside and outside of this material body. It is self reflection, self awareness and the impossibility of containing these forces.”

Tedeschi’s use of found and constructed materials examine notions of the ideal and the damaged; concurrent polarities of the human condition. Rebuilding an aspect of his domestic environment presents an odd familiar likeness, a faux partial habitat, producing an uneasy David Lynch-ian feel. It is the directness of his methodology which belays the awkwardness and preciousness of most art/architectural fabrication. Construction materials are treated as such; his frontal approach is both incisive and psychological.

Other works in the exhibition mine similar territories of replication and space. His Blind installation employs a two sided wood paneled structure with matching, lighted window blinds. It is a walk-around wall, impenetrable and off-putting with a Twilight Zone stillness. In contrast – and adjacent, is an old broom strung to a slow whirling ceiling fan, bumping and brushing the ground in relentless circles. Both these works present a kind of banal and situational activity/anxiety similar to Bruce Nauman’s frustrating 1960’s and 70’s art. Tedeschi further plays the opposite chords with his framed and resin soaked images of tropical paradise. The collages are Home Depot generic sunsets with hailing cutlery; images of nature and culture in a continuous, endless battle.

Verity is the fuel of Tedeschi’s work. Open-handed and flat-footed, he is able to the petition the ordinary into mysterious and often contrary experiences.

Tedeschi lives and works in Los Angeles. He is Assistant Professor in Sculpture at California State University, Northridge. His solo exhibition, Throwing the blanket over the invisible man, was recently seen at the California Baptist University, Riverside, California. He was also included in “Reverberation”, curated by Andre Woodward at the Huntington Arts Center, “Object Orange” Spontaneous Interventions: Design Actions for the Common Good, U.S. Pavilion Venice Architecture Biennial, Venice, Italy; and has exhibited at the Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago; FELTspace, Adelaide, South Australia; Pavilion am Milchof, Berlin, Germany; Free Museum Of Dallas, Dallas, Texas; Occidental College, Los Angeles, California and numerous other galleries and institutions.

His work has been written about in Newsweek, LA WEEKLY, Art LTD, Bloomberg Press, San Diego Union Tribune, and many other art publications. Tedeschi’s art has also been the subject on All Things Considered, on National Public Radio.

For images and more information contact the gallery: cliff@western-project.com / erin@western-project.com

BIG MESS: Margaret Griffith, Kyla Hansen, Christian Tedeschi

April 6 - May 4, 2013 Opening Reception: Saturday, April 6, 6:00 - 8:00 PM

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Western Project is proud to present three sculptors from Los Angeles. BIG MESS is a tongue-in-cheek wrap around of works that are essentially untoward; objects entwined, piled, stitched, wrapped or encased in resin, with materials such as paper, blankets, toilet paper, X-mas tree lights, or broom bristles. A phoenix of debris, the exhibition pokes at suburban lifestyle aesthetics and ideals; handicrafts, patriotism, sports, architecture, privacy and clutter horror. Each artist investigates a personal narrative and process with materials.

Margaret Griffith uses the structures of gates and fences found in her community to create hand-cut paper sculptures, monuments to fragility and impermanence. She transforms the rigidity of steel structures into billowy forms; folded veils as sublime renderings of environmental boundaries, delicate reminders of the fiction of permanence. In the spirit of feminism and land art of the 1970s, Griffith’s work recalls the explorations of Jackie Ferrara, Alice Aycock, and Jackie Windsor.

Kyla Hansen creates textiles and uses found objects in a punked-up language from desert suburbia. She stacks stools, cast wood stumps, crocheted blankets and holiday lights into a ten foot construct of home-style liberty. Darkly giddy, her works dredge the family garage for elements such as golf clubs, old yarn and glitter to declare: USA (!) in a limp paper-mache curve; the kind of dysfunction all men dread. Her giant The End and Shit is reminiscent of traditional Gee’s Bend textiles, while echoing American survivalist fears of Judgment Day. Her work addresses domestic values similar to the late Mike Kelley, with a wink and sharpened utensil.

Christian Tedeschi’s work mines ideas about the human body, and male identity. Using socks, sports uniforms or hoodies, the artist twists and stretches them into resin-ed forms, part-time artifacts, or small monuments to unknown lives lived and games played. His 400 Years, a 48 inch diameter roll of toilet paper is also glazed with resin; a mock wheel of life and/or clock of bodily functions. Tedeschi stretches a Superman uniform around a steel rod thirteen feet high as a primary colored lingam and testament to heroics, a contrast to Brancusi’s Bird in Space, or Giacometti’s existential slender human figures of the early 20th century. The large Untitled sculpture made with thousands of plastic broom bristles is nearly anthropomorphic as a mass of black and yellow stands hovering over it’s own black pool on the ground. The piece is a hypnotic and visceral relative to 1960s and 70s string art, but now alarming and wet in appearance.

Each of the artists work is straight forward and obsessive, and sometimes expressionistic. In 1980, the punk band X proclaimed: The World’s A Mess It’s In My Kiss, a right-to-the-point declaration. In this exhibition the work mirrors a similar message using an everyday kind of vernacular; a sly hustle, conceptually rooted, alluring and slightly toxic.

Christian Tedeschi recently completed a solo exhibition, Throwing a Blanket Over the Invisible Man at the California Baptist University, Riverside, California, and as part of the art collective, Object Orange, was included in, Spontaneous Interventions: Design Actions for the Common Good, U.S. Pavilion Venice Architecture Biennial 2012, Venice, Italy. His work has also been shown at the Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado, Woodbury University, San Diego, Occidental College, Los Angeles and the Torrance Art Museum, as well as in galleries in Germany and Australia. He is an MFA graduate of Cranbrook Academy of Art, and teaches sculpture at California State University Northridge, Northridge, California.

Kyla Hansen was recently included in The 10th Circle, curated by David Pagel at VAST Space Projects in Henderson, Nevada She has shown at the University of California, Long Beach, Raid Projects, Los Angeles, and the Peggy Phelps Gallery, Claremont Graduate University, Claremont, California, and UCLA New Wight Gallery. She recently completed her MFA at Claremont Graduate University, Claremont, California.

Margaret Griffith has exhibited at the Torrance Art Museum, Santa Monica Museum of Art, Long Beach Museum of Art, Woodbury University, Armory Center for the Arts, Pasadena, Orange Coast College, Costa Mesa, California, Jancar Gallery, Los Angeles, and the Museo Archeologico di Amelia, Amelia (TERNI), Italy, She received an MFA from Cranbrook Academy of Art in 2001 and is represented by the Ruth Bachofner Gallery in Santa Monica, California.